Posted by: gargupie | March 21, 2011

Tapioca and Taro Sweet Coconut Soup

When you think of desserts, cakes, pies, or ice-cream comes into mind. But in Asian cuisines,  sweet tooth is often satisfied with sweet soups. Yes, that’s right. Dessert in liquid form.  Sweet bean soups are most common, but for starchier variations, taro or sweet yam is also featured.  I had a small can of coconut milk on hand, so I decided to make a tapioca, taro sweet coconut soup.  Tapioca is used as a thickener and also provides  toothsome texture to the liquified dish. 

Boil everything together and sweeten to taste. I like my soup more condensed, so I used less water.  A warming invitation to my tummy.

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Responses

  1. Never heard of soup desserts, but I know a sweet soup recipe from my childhood (although we usually ate it for main), and it is also a very traditional northern German recipe. It’s a purple colored soup made from elder berry juice with semolina dumplings and apple pieces. Very yummy! And if you use almond milk for the dumplings, it would also be vegan. 🙂

    • Oo…I think I would love this soup, too! I love borcht. I ate a lot of the vegetarian version when I visited Poland. 🙂

  2. A local Chinese restaurant (authentic Chinese food) serves a soup dessert kind of like this. With beans! It always seems a little weird but it is delicious and I always eat the whole thing!

  3. And it’s ‘healthy’, too! No guilt. :)Great to hear from you!

  4. I didn’t know that Taro was used in soups. Interesting.

    • Yea. It’s treated like sweet potato or yam.


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